Here’s a thing I’ve been wanting for a while now, and have been unable to something to suite my needs (well, more wants than needs, I guess). I end up generating a lot of text/documentation for various things (both at home and work), normally spread around a little - project descriptions and introductions in READMEs, APIs and design plans in wikis, sometimes random files, etc, and wanted the ability to consolidate these into collections that could be nicely presented, either publicly or for team reference.

My preferred requirements, which were not met by existing solutions such as Sphinx, Read the Docs, Beautiful docs and Daux.io are:

  • No need to pre/post processing the input documents as a separate “compile” or parsing step
    • Should use existing plain Markdown documents as input and format output at runtime only
  • Along with the above, the documents should be “live” - if I change the source file, I don’t want to “recompile” my documentation pages, they should reflect changes by default
  • Not a hosted solution
    • Particularly, something anyone can drop on a private server (work environment) or whatever they want to do with it
  • No server-side requirements beyond simple HTTP file serving
  • I may be out of the JavaScript development scene, but what’s up with requiring users to use a dozen different build systems and dependency management frameworks to use your JavaScript app these days?
    • Seriously, the attraction used to be that you could simply drop a couple of HTML, CSS and JS files in your www-root and magic came out. Get off my lawn!

My solution is Markdocs - a simple HTML and JavaScript application for organising individual Markdown documents as a documentation collection.

See the README on the Markdocs GitHub page for usage instructions. Basically, you define the documents to include via a simple JSON file, which is loaded at runtime. The required documents are then loaded using jQuery, parsed at runtime with Marked right in the user’s browser, and a table of contents and the documents themselves are generated and presented using a simple Semantic UI interface.

At present it’s perfectly usable, but there are still a couple of things I want to improve and add, including suitable inter-document linking (while not enforcing any magic link syntax - your stand-alone document should still work as stand-alone documents) and ability to provide links to the individual source documents as well as an “Edit” link (for example, let you define a link to the editable document on GitHub).

Will update as it progresses.